Excerpt from “Opposites, differentiating experience”

TABOR: The Apprentice’s Book of Reflections by D.B. GaNung

Excerpt from “Opposites, differentiating experience”

To ignore opposites when they reveal pertinent polarities is as wrong as applying this
principle to everything. Living a more balanced life without undue emphasis or
premature integration allows the moment to develop its full value in retrospect.
Attempting to resolve things while they are still developing is almost sure to limit
the potential for growth. Allowing an experience to be more or less absorbed forms
a sense of containment that can assist later upon contemplation. One can sift and
sort things by discovering the binding and often contradictory truths that wind
through it all—a pair of opposites in tandem.

Excerpt from “Fashion, time”

TABOR: The Apprentice’s Book of Reflections by D.B. GaNung

Excerpt from “Fashion, time”

A period of time might be seen as relative to your place only but the truth is this
same time period is relative all over the world. One need only to scratch a bit
beneath the cultural veneer to find the ongoing imitative current not only present,
but ready to develop the fashionable popular themes.

The absence of opportunity to develop according to the times is consistently felt and
is the means by which some feel they are less fortunate. If a promising youth were
removed from the repressive aspects of a social condition there arises an aptitude
that will fashion itself via current trends.

Excerpt from “Complex, conscious”

TABOR: The Apprentice’s Book of Reflections by D.B. GaNung

Excerpt from “Complex, conscious”

The many different aspects of consciousness have each an underlying complex
supporting them. These complexes are the means through which iceberg below the
tip connects to us and our bodily habits.

Complexes are like a crystalline structure as well as a seedbed of all that we have been
and could be. Symptoms of a complex made neurotic come out through
autonomous behavior patterns. Healthier minds have an aura of soulfulness about
them that comes through the physical body. No matter how crippled or deformed
the body, a soul more complete can shine through. A complex can sometimes be
revealed through the shadow.

Excerpt from “Wisdom, achieving”

TABOR: The Apprentice’s Book of Reflections by D.B. GaNung

Excerpt from “Wisdom, achieving”

The plunge into the depths of oneself is a trial from which only a newly minted
individual can surface. The symbols of silver and gold suffice to emblazon this
attainment.

Guidance is required. Those who make it have likely suffered long for the hard-won
golden nuggets of new consciousness. Attributes required to combat bouts of
sluggishness are an effort coupled with a keen eye on various virtues. The
battlegrounds are where we’ve given way to inane indulgence or overwhelming
compensation. If we live a life victimizing ourselves for the very lack of developing
own potential we bring about a very unsatisfying life. This would be a life of various
illusions or compensatory behaviors in lieu of the life we thought we’d live.

Excerpt from “Consciousness, differentiated”

TABOR: The Apprentice’s Book of Reflections by D.B. GaNung

Excerpt from “Consciousness, differentiated”

The mind, as the discriminating element of the soul, exists to create more conscious
awareness along with ordering and running the responsibilities in the world we exist
in.

A demand that irrational things be made perfectly clear in presentation would be a
defection from the awareness of how things are ordered in the natural world and
man’s humble place in these affairs. Making allowance in the rational for a certain
inaccuracy in the irrational behaviors allows another dimension to enter. Parallels
can be found to suit the personality, so to loosen it up.

Excerpt from “Neurotic behavior”

TABOR: The Apprentice’s Book of Reflections by D.B. GaNung

Excerpt from “Neurotic behavior”

We fool ourselves first when we think we are fooling other people. Repression
reduces energy available for the discriminatory faculties, thus complicating an
already difficult situation. This results in untimely reflexes to difficult situations.
These are often typical of a particular or common neurosis therefore obvious to
other more balanced people in less than a heartbeat. Do not despair; for as we all
know, to rid ourselves of all our demons could very well result in the loss of our
angels.

Excerpt from “Experience, youth/age”

TABOR: The Apprentice’s Book of Reflections by D.B. GaNung

Excerpt from “Experience, youth/age”

Experiencing the world brings resourcefulness to bear, confirming our intentions
through repetitions. For the young, affirmation is attained through recognition and
attention for what they have achieved once or several times. They seek the
confirmation from the older mature personality who has seen it in many variations.
Physical attractiveness can initiate the process of attaining attention, but being
handsome or beautiful cannot validate maturation.

Why do so many make a fuss over the loss of youth? Have the older not
differentiated from what was externally attractive to others for the sake of
development to what is fulfilling and meaningful? Have those who are older not
uncovered the necessary truths leading to a sustaining meaning of life?

Excerpt from “Neurosis and personality disorders”

TABOR: The Apprentice’s Book of Reflections by D.B. GaNung

Excerpt from “Neurosis and personality disorders”

Personality disorder could be seen as an interior problem exteriorized. It is
predominantly common to the extraverted personality, whereas the neurosis comes
from what is primarily feared in the exterior and is common to the predominantly
introverted person. If these are not the exact definitions of your preferred
psychology, they could be!

The morbid fear of the inner world in the personality disorder is then acted out, and
the results are an attempt to draw one to one’s own even greater depths. The fear or
lack of it in outer development within the neurotic are the external symptoms
drawing one to even greater depths.

Excerpt from “Corporate style”

TABOR: The Apprentice’s Book of Reflections by D.B. GaNung

Excerpt from “Corporate style”

A newly hired individual in an organization is subjected to comment on personal
style and personal background. Too often initiates supply far too much information
in their desire to quickly fit in—Information that could be used against the
individual in unfair comparisons later. It’s best not to say much. Action in
adaptation to responsibilities says more than anything else. When one is quiet,
adaptation is quicker and easier. Mistakes enough abound.

Conformity is the key to getting along within an organization. Early recognition of
organizational patterns determines the first real impact. Adapting to the manner of
the current corporate tone is seen as submission to the good of the group.

Endorsement from James Hollis, Ph. D.

TABOR: The Apprentice’s Book of Reflections by D.B. GaNung

Endorsement from James Hollis, Ph. D.:

D. B. GaNung, a merchant mariner, has sailed the external world and seen many
ports, many climes, and many beliefs, but he has also explored the inner world, not
only reading extensively on those long voyages, but refl ecting, forming opinions,
assembling a world view. In Tabor he shares a multiplicity of insights, perspectives,
and conclusions with which to challenge the reader. In earlier decades, people read
such refl ections as a catalyst to the formation of their own character. Tabor returns
us productively to that tradition, and to the prospect of greater thoughtfulness in the
conduct of our lives.

James Hollis, Ph. D., Jungian Analyst and author.